Labor Seal NYS Department of Labor                          

Contact Leo Rosales Cell: 518-281-6167 Office: 518-457-5519 Email: leo.rosales@labor.ny.gov www.labor.ny.gov
New York State's Recession Deepened in 2009
Highest Annual Average Unemployment Rate Since 1992

Albany, NY (March 04, 2010) - Newly revised jobs data show New York State's private sector job count, after seasonal adjustment, peaked at 7,313,300 in April 2008, the State Labor Department reported today. From April 2008 to December 2009, the private sector count declined rapidly, resulting in a loss of 352,700 jobs (-4.8 percent).

New York State's private sector employment count averaged 7,031,900 in 2009, down 245,400, or 3.4 percent, from 2008. By way of comparison, private sector jobs in the nation decreased by 5.2 percent between 2008 and 2009. Over the same period, total nonfarm jobs, including government, in New York decreased 236,900, or 2.7 percent, while the number of U.S. nonfarm jobs dropped by 4.3 percent.

"Our newly-revised jobs data indicate that the impact of the national recession on New York State's economy was deeper than first estimated. Between 2008 and 2009, the drop in New York State's private sector job count increased from 183,300 to 245,400. In addition, new labor force data show that the state's average annual unemployment rate climbed from 5.3 percent in 2008 to 8.4 percent in 2009, its highest level since 1992," said Peter A. Neenan, Ph.D., director of the Division of Research and Statistics.

Jobs data are revised at the end of each year for all states and the nation, as more comprehensive information, or benchmarks, become available from employers' unemployment insurance tax records. The benchmark process resulted in revisions to all jobs data back to April 2008. March 2009 is the "reference month" and is the latest month for which employment estimates will not be revised in the future. Estimates for April 2009 and later are still subject to revision in the next round of annual revisions in early 2011.

Monthly resident labor force data, including unemployment rates, are also revised at the end of each year as part of the normal, annual end-of-year benchmarking process, following procedures specified by the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. After revision, the annual statewide unemployment rate increased from 5.3 percent in 2008 to 8.4 percent in 2009, its highest annual level since 1992. The revised data also indicate that the annual average number of unemployed in New York State climbed from 514,300 in 2008 to 813,400 in 2009, an increase of 299,100 or 58.1 percent.

Job data for metropolitan areas (not seasonally adjusted): 2008-2009
Area job growth data for 2008 and 2009 are shown in the table below. All of the state's metropolitan areas experienced weaker private sector job performance in 2009 than in 2008. Between 2008 and 2009, the annual average private sector job count decreased in every metropolitan area. In 2009, declines in private sector employment were most pronounced in Putnam-Rockland-Westchester (-4.6 percent), Binghamton (-4.3 percent), Nassau-Suffolk (-3.7 percent), and Kingston (-3.6 percent). Metro areas in New York State with the smallest percentage declines in private sector jobs during 2008-2009 included: Ithaca (-1.4 percent), Utica-Rome (-2.0 percent), Glens Falls (-2.5 percent), and Albany-Schenectady-Troy (-2.6 percent).

 

Percent Change in Annual Average Job Counts:
United States, New York State, Regions, and Metropolitan Areas
2007-2008 and 2008-2009
 
  Total Nonfarm   Private Sector
  2007-2008   2008-2009   2007-2008   2008-2009
 
United States -0.6%   -4.3%   -1.0%   -5.2%
New York State 0.7%   -2.7%   0.6%   -3.4%
 
   Regions  
Downstate (10-county area) 0.9%   -2.9%   0.9%   -3.5%
      New York City 1.3%   -2.8%   1.4%   -3.3%
      Suburban Counties -0.1%   -3.3%   -0.2%   -4.0%
Upstate (52-county area) 0.4%   -1.9%   0.1%   -2.5%
      Metro Areas 0.4%   -2.4%   0.2%   -3.0%
      Non-metro Counties 0.2%   0.0%   -0.2%   0.0%
 
   Metropolitan Areas  
Albany-Schenectady-Troy 0.7%   -2.1%   0.6%   -2.6%
Binghamton 0.3%   -3.0%   -0.1%   -4.3%
Buffalo-Niagara Falls 0.8%   -2.6%   0.7%   -3.2%
Glens Falls -0.2%   -1.1%   0.5%   -2.5%
Ithaca 0.9%   -0.5%   1.3%   -1.4%
Kingston -1.1%   -2.7%   -1.9%   -3.6%
Nassau-Suffolk* -0.1%   -3.0%   -0.3%   -3.7%
New York City* 1.3%   -2.8%   1.4%   -3.3%
Poughkeepsie-Newburgh-Middletown -0.1%   -2.6%   -0.6%   -3.2%
Putnam-Rockland-Westchester* 0.1%   -3.9%   -0.2%   -4.6%
Rochester 0.3%   -2.5%   0.1%   -3.2%
Syracuse 0.3%   -2.6%   0.1%   -3.2%
Utica-Rome 0.1%   -1.5%   -0.5%   -2.0%
*Denotes Downstate area

 

Job data by industry: 2008-2009
Statewide industry job growth data for 2008 and 2009 are presented in the table below. Educational and health services added the most jobs (+34,000) of any private sector industry between 2008 and 2009. Gains in this sector were centered in health care and social assistance (+25,000). The only other industry group that added jobs during 2008-2009 was government (+8,400), which grew due to gains at the local level (+10,700).

Trade, transportation and utilities experienced the largest employment decline, shedding 66,800 jobs between 2008 and 2009. Sector losses were concentrated in wholesale and retail trade (-55,300). Professional and business services had the second largest number of job losses (-60,300) from 2008 to 2009. Most losses in this group were in administrative and support services (-32,000), which includes temporary help agencies. Manufacturing lost 54,800 jobs between 2008 and 2009, with losses centered in durable goods (-35,400). Other industries that lost jobs over the year include: financial activities; construction; information; leisure and hospitality; other services; and natural resources and mining.

 

Change in Annual Average Jobs by Industry:
New York State, 2008-2009
(data in thousands)
 
  Annual Average Jobs   Net   Percent
  2008   2009   Change   Change
 
Total Nonfarm 8,792.8   8,555.9   -236.9   -2.7%
Private Sector 7,277.3   7,031.9   -245.4   -3.4%
  Natural Resources & Mining 6.3   5.4   -0.9   -14.3%
  Construction 359.7   323.9   -35.8   -10.0%
  Manufacturing 531.9   477.1   -54.8   -10.3%
     Durable Goods 316.9   281.5   -35.4   -11.2%
     Non-durable Goods 214.9   195.6   -19.3   -9.0%
  Trade, Trans. & Utilities 1,522.8   1,456.0   -66.8   -4.4%
     Wholesale Trade 351.6   330.5   -21.1   -6.0%
     Retail Trade 895.4   861.2   -34.2   -3.8%
     Transp., Warehousing & Utilities 275.8   264.3   -11.5   -4.2%
  Information 263.6   253.7   -9.9   -3.8%
  Financial Activities 720.4   677.9   -42.5   -5.9%
  Professional & Business Services 1,156.6   1,096.3   -60.3   -5.2%
  Educational & Health Services 1,631.2   1,665.2   34.0   2.1%
     Educational Services 375.7   384.7   9.0   2.4%
     Health Care & Social Assistance 1,255.5   1,280.5   25.0   2.0%
  Leisure & Hospitality 717.2   711.2   -6.0   -0.8%
  Other Services 367.6   365.1   -2.5   -0.7%
Government 1,515.5   1,523.9   8.4   0.6%

 

JANUARY 2010 JOB NUMBERS

In January 2010, New York State's seasonally adjusted private sector job count increased by 30,500 or 0.4 percent to 6,991,100, the State Labor Department reported today. Since the state's private sector job count peaked in April 2008, it has lost 322,200 private sector jobs through January 2010, or about 80 percent of the employment added during the state's 2003-2008 economic expansion. The statewide total nonfarm job count (private plus public sectors) also increased over the month -- by 25,500, or 0.3 percent, to 8,486,400 in January 2010.

Note: When comparing different months, seasonally adjusted data provide the most valid comparison; for example, December 2009 versus January 2010. Non-seasonally adjusted data are valuable in year-to-year comparisons of the same month; for example, January 2009 versus January 2010.

1.) Unemployment rates (seasonally adjusted):

New York State's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased from 8.9 percent in December to 8.8 percent in January 2010. In January 2009, the state's rate was 7.1 percent. The U.S. rate decreased from 10.0 percent in December 2009 to 9.7 percent in January 2010. In January 2009, the nation's rate was 7.7 percent.

New York City's rate decreased from 10.5 percent in December to 10.4 percent in January 2010. In January 2009, the city's rate was 7.5 percent. The rate outside of New York City decreased from 7.8 percent in December to 7.7 percent in January 2010. In January 2009, the rate outside of New York City was 6.8 percent.

Unemployment Rates* (seasonally adjusted) 
  January 2010* December 2009 January 2009
New York State 8.8 8.9 7.1
United States 9.7 10.0 7.7
New York City 10.4 10.5 7.5
NYS, excluding NYC 7.7 7.8 6.8
*Data are preliminary and subject to change.

2.) Regular Unemployment Insurance, Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC08) and Extended Benefits (EB) data (not seasonally adjusted):

The regular Unemployment Insurance (Regular UI), the four tiers of the federal Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC08), and the state Extended Benefits (EB) programs are described in the table below. Reference week beneficiaries data for these programs are noted in a separate table below. (Note: The reference week refers to the week containing the 12th day of the month.)

Program Name
Description Maximum Weeks of Benefits
Regular Unemployment Insurance (UI)
Individuals who are involuntarily unemployed through no fault of their own. Must remain ready, willing and able to work, and are actively seeking employment.
Up to 26 weeks
Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC08)
Tiers 1 and 2
The federal EUC08 program enacted on June 30, 2008 provided claimants who have exhausted their regular UI with 13 weeks of emergency benefits. Federal legislation signed on December 21, 2008 added 20 additional weeks of emergency benefits.
Up to 33 weeks
Extended Benefits (EB)
State legislation signed into law on May 20, 2009 provides additional weeks of Extended Benefits (EB) for individuals who have exhausted their EUC08 benefits.
Up to 20 weeks
Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC08)
Tiers 3 and 4
Federal legislation signed on November 6, 2009 added 20 additional weeks of emergency benefits.
Up to 20 weeks

The temporary federal Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC08) program, enacted on June 30, 2008, permits claimants who have exhausted their 26 weeks of regular benefits to receive up to 13 weeks of additional benefits (Tier 1). Federal legislation signed into law on December 21, 2008 (Tier 2) added up to 20 more weeks to the original 13 weeks of EUC08 benefits. Federal legislation enacted on November 6, 2009 added up to 20 more weeks of EUC08 benefits to the 33 weeks of previously authorized EUC08 benefits. A total of up to 53 weeks of EUC08 benefits are now available to individuals who exhaust their 26 weeks of regular UI.

State legislation signed on May 20, 2009, provides additional weeks of Extended Benefits (EB) for individuals who have exhausted their EUC08 benefits. Currently, up to 20 weeks of EB are available because the State's three-month average seasonally adjusted unemployment rate exceeds 8.0 percent.

Federal legislation signed on December 19, 2009, extends the deadline for which an individual may initially establish eligibility for EUC benefits from December 31, 2009 to February 28, 2010. The December 31, 2009 deadline for individuals collecting EB was also extended to February 28, 2010. Finally, the deadline for individuals moving from one EUC tier to the next was extended to February 28, 2010. A total of 53 weeks of EUC are now available to individuals who exhaust their third tier of EUC benefits by February 28, 2010 and can enter the last tier, for a grand total of 99 weeks of regular UI/EB/EUC benefits.

On March 2, 2010, President Obama signed legislation extending the federal UI extensions (EUC, EB and FAC). The last date to file for the extensions was changed from February 28, 2010 to April 4, 2010.

An unduplicated count of 599,206 unemployed individuals received regular UI, EUC08, or EB as compensation for unemployment during the reference week in January 2010. These beneficiaries accounted for 70.3 percent of the 851,980 total unemployed in New York State.

Program and Data Item* January 2010 December 2009 January 2009
Regular UI, reference week beneficiaries
293,642
269,947
286,761
Regular UI, year-to-date beneficiaries
408,878
1,051,525
390,935
EUC08, reference week beneficiaries
335,232
307,362
78,725
EUC08, year-to-date beneficiaries
378,856
544,795
146,740
EB, reference week beneficiaries
26,587
38,219
NA
EB, year-to-date beneficiaries
32,822
120,919
NA
* Data are preliminary and subject to revision. The regular UI, EUC08, and EB beneficiary data may contain duplicate counts as people move from one program to another. Note: EUC08 Tier 1 began 7/13/2008; Tier 2 began 2/22/2009; Tier 3 began 11/15/2009. Extended Benefits began 5/24/2009.

3.) Job data (seasonally adjusted):

New York State and the nation, December 2009-January 2010:

The number of private sector jobs in New York State increased by 30,500, or 0.4 percent, to 6,991,100 in January 2010, on a seasonally adjusted basis. Nationally, the number of private sector jobs decreased by less than 0.1 percent over the same period. After seasonal adjustment, the number of nonfarm jobs (private plus public sectors) in the state increased over the month by 25,500, or 0.3 percent, to 8,486,400 in January 2010. Nationally, the number of seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs also decreased by less than 0.1 percent in January.

4.) Nonfarm jobs since January 2009 (not seasonally adjusted):
  Total nonfarm jobs   -183,900
  Private sector jobs   -161,500

Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs (private plus public sectors) in New York State decreased by 183,900, or 2.2 percent, and the number of private sector jobs decreased by 161,500, or 2.3 percent. Nationally, the number of nonfarm jobs decreased by 3.0 percent and the number of private sector jobs decreased by 3.5 percent between January 2009 and January 2010.

Educational and health services (+18,200) registered the largest gain among major industry sectors over the January 2009-January 2010 period. Within this sector, the greatest increase was in health care and social assistance (+25,500). Leisure and hospitality (+9,400) gained jobs over the year with its gains concentrated in the food services and drinking places industry (+6,500).

Among industry sectors shedding jobs over the past year:
 
Manufacturing (-44,100) registered the largest over-the-year drop among declining sectors. Losses in this sector were concentrated in durable goods (-32,300), especially computer and electronic product manufacturing (-7,600).
     
 
Trade, transportation and utilities lost 42,600 jobs between January 2009 and January 2010. Most losses in this sector occurred in wholesale and retail trade (-35,200).
     
 
The construction sector lost 32,000 jobs over the year. Specialty trade contractors experienced the largest decline within the sector (-25,800).
     
 
Financial services lost 30,000 jobs over the year. More than one-half of the losses in this sector occurred in the securities and commodity contracts industry (-15,700).
     
 
Job losses in professional and business services (-28,900) were concentrated in professional, scientific and technical services (-25,100).
     
 
Jobs also decreased over the year in government, information, other services, and natural resources and mining.

 

Change in Jobs by Sector,
January 2009 – January 2010
Sectors with Job Gain:
     Educational & Health Services +18,200
     Leisure & Hospitality +9,400
 
Sectors with Job Losses:
     Manufacturing -44,100
     Trade, Transportation & Utilities -42,600
     Construction -32,000
     Financial Activities -30,000
     Professional & Business Services -28,900
     Government -22,400
     Information -9,600
     Other Services -1,600
     Natural Resources & Mining -300

 


5.) Nonfarm jobs since December 2009 (not seasonally adjusted):
  Total nonfarm jobs   -248,500
  Private sector jobs   -209,900

In January 2010, New York State had 8,322,100 total nonfarm jobs, including 6,837,400 private sector jobs. From December 2009 to January 2010, the number of nonfarm jobs decreased by 248,500 and the number of private sector jobs decreased by 209,900. On average, in the previous ten years, the number of nonfarm jobs in New York decreased by 305,700 from December to January, and the number of private sector jobs decreased by 274,900.

The not seasonally adjusted job count decreased over the month in all major industry sectors: trade, transportation and utilities (-58,200), educational and health services (-54,800), government (-38,600), construction (-29,100), leisure and hospitality (-29,000), professional and business services (-15,900), manufacturing (-6,500), information (-5,800), other services (-5,300), financial activities (-4,700), and natural resources and mining (-600).

6.) New York State nonfarm job highlights since December 2009 (not seasonally adjusted):

Natural resources and mining
Natural resources and mining sector employment dropped seasonally.

Financial activities
Losses in the financial activities sector were largest in real estate and rental and leasing.

Other services
Over-the-month job losses were centered in religious, grantmaking, civic, professional and similar organizations.

Information
This month's loss in information sector employment was focused in motion picture and sound recording.

Manufacturing
Manufacturing employment decreased over the month, with the durable goods sector experiencing the largest job losses in January.

Professional and business services
Losses in professional and business services were centered in administrative and support services.

Leisure and hospitality
Over-the-month declines in leisure and hospitality sector employment were centered in accommodation and food services.

Construction
Construction sector employment decreased seasonally, especially in specialty trade contractors.

Government
Seasonal decreases at public elementary and secondary schools, part of local government, accounted for most of the over-the-month loss in government jobs.

Educational and health services
Sector employment decreased over the month due mainly to seasonal losses at private colleges, universities and professional schools.

Trade, transportation and utilities
Most of this month's employment decrease reflected seasonal job losses in retail trade, especially general merchandise and clothing stores.

7.) Metropolitan Areas:

Job Growth and Unemployment Rates (not seasonally adjusted):

Note: All data reported in this section are not seasonally adjusted; the most valid comparisons with this type of data are year-to-year comparisons of the same month, for example, January 2009 versus January 2010.

Albany-Schenectady-Troy: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 10,200, or 2.3 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 7,600, or 2.3 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 7.8 percent in January 2010, compared with 6.9 in December and 6.8 in January 2009.

Binghamton: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 3,100, or 2.8 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 3,100, or 3.6 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 9.7 percent in January 2010, compared with 8.6 in December and 8.3 in January 2009.

Buffalo-Niagara Falls: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 7,800, or 1.5 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 7,600, or 1.7 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 9.2 percent in January 2010, compared with 8.3 in December and 8.7 in January 2009.

Glens Falls: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has increased by 400, or 0.8 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has increased by 400, or 1.0 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 9.7 percent in January 2010, compared with 8.5 in December and 8.9 in January 2009.

Ithaca: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 300, or 0.5 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 300, or 0.6 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 6.5 percent in January 2010, compared with 5.5 in December and 5.5 in January 2009.

Kingston: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 900, or 1.5 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 500, or 1.1 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 8.8 percent in January 2010, compared with 7.8 in December and 7.6 in January 2009.

Nassau-Suffolk: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 8,600, or 0.7 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 9,700, or 1.0 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 7.8 percent in January 2010, compared with 7.0 in December and 6.8 in January 2009.

New York City (five boroughs): Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 98,400, or 2.7 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 78,100, or 2.5 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 10.5 percent in January 2010, compared with 10.4 in December and 7.8 in January 2009.

Poughkeepsie-Newburgh-Middletown: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 4,500, or 1.8 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 3,800, or 2.0 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 8.5 percent in January 2010, compared with 7.7 in December and 7.3 in January 2009.

Putnam-Rockland-Westchester: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 19,900, or 3.6 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 18,400, or 4.0 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 7.6 percent in January 2010, compared with 6.9 in December and 6.6 in January 2009.

Rochester: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 9,100, or 1.8 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 10,600, or 2.5 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 8.7 percent in January 2010, compared with 8.0 in December and 7.8 in January 2009.

Syracuse: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 5,200, or 1.7 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has decreased by 4,800, or 1.9 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 9.1 percent in January 2010, compared with 8.2 in December and 8.1 in January 2009.

Utica-Rome: Since January 2009, the number of nonfarm jobs has decreased by 200, or 0.2 percent, and the number of private sector jobs has increased by 200, or 0.2 percent. The area's unemployment rate was 8.7 percent in January 2010, compared with 7.7 in December and 8.1 in January 2009.

Note: Labor force statistics, including the unemployment rate, for New York and every other state are based on statistical regression models specified by the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Jobs data for New York are obtained from a survey of 18,000 business establishments. Jobs data exclude agricultural workers, the self-employed, unpaid family workers and domestic workers in private households.

See State and Area Jobs Data

See State and Area Unemployment Rates

See Jobs and Unemployment Fact Sheet

See Labor Market Overview